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VR
The Rise of ICP







Formation of the group

Joseph Bruce (Violent J) and Joseph Utsler (Shaggy 2 Dope) met in Oak Park, a suburb on the North border of Detroit, Michigan. Along with Utsler's brother, John, and friend, Lacy, they wrestled in backyard rings that they had built themselves.[2] They also listened to hip hop music, including 3rd Bass, Beastie Boys, N.W.A and local rappers like Awesome Dre.[2] In 1989, Joseph Bruce, as Jagged Joe, Joseph Utsler, as Kangol Joe, and John Utsler, as Master J, released the single titled "Party at the Top of the Hill" under the name of JJ Boys, but the group did not pursue a serious career in music.[3] Poverty and a difficult home life drove Bruce to move in with Rudy "The Rude Boy" Hill in River Rouge, a city near the industrial southwest side of Detroit.[4]

Feeling a sense of home and belonging, Bruce formed a gang called Inner City Posse, which was composed of Joseph Utsler, Rudy Hill, other friends of Bruce, and a number of other connections he had made in Southwest Detroit.[4] Bruce was jailed for ninety days in 1989–1990 for death threats, robbery, and violating probation;[5] this experience convinced him to reduce his involvement in gang life.[5] Bruce began his professional wrestling career after getting out of jail, and it was at his first show that he met Rob Van Dam and Sabu, two other first-timers with whom he became very good friends.[5] During this time Bruce brought Utsler backstage with him, and all four became close friends.

Bruce became frustrated with the backstage politics of the wrestling business and began searching for another career.[5] Back on the streets, Bruce, Utsler and Utsler's brother, John performed hip hop music at local night clubs, using the stage names Violent J, 2 Dope, and John Kickjazz, under the name of their gang, Inner City Posse.[3] Seeing a need for a manager, Bruce's brother Robert recommended his friend and record store owner Alex Abbiss, who established the Psychopathic Records record label with the group in 1991. Later that year the group released the self-produced EP entitled Dog Beats.[6]

Local radio broadcasters were reluctant to play the EP's single, "Dog Beats", because Inner City Posse's members were white.[7] While trying to get stations to play the single, Bruce learned that one of the stations he and Abbiss visited would be interviewing local rapper Esham, who Bruce considered to be a "superstar"; Bruce had recently begun to collect Esham's albums, as he had done with other local rappers; by the time he had discovered Esham, the rapper had released two full length albums and three EPs.[7] Bruce met Esham for the first time at the station and appraised him. Esham wished Bruce well and Bruce gave the rapper a copy of Dog Beats; this later began the friendship and professional relationship between Psychopathic Records and Esham's label, Reel Life Productions.[7] Growing popularity in the local music scene turned negative for the group's gang, which became the target of growing violence. After receiving jail sentences, the group members abandoned gang life.[5]

In late 1991, the group invested more money into production than was covered by returns. The group decided that its gangsta rap forbidden was the cause of the problem: Most emcees at the time used similar forbiddens, making it difficult for Inner City Posse to distinguish itself stylistically.[8] Referring to local rapper Esham's horrorcore forbidden, Bruce suggested the band adapt this genre, in a bid to have Detroit represent acid rap, much as Los Angeles represented gangsta rap. The group agreed, but not to copying the forbidden of Esham closely. Instead, they suggested using horror-themed lyrics as an emotional outlet for all their negative life experiences. They were also unanimous in deciding not to rap openly about Satan, which Esham often did.[8]

After the change in musical forbidden, the group decided it needed a new name. Utsler suggested keeping the "I.C.P." initials to inform the community that Inner City Posse was not defunct, an idea to which the group agreed.[8] Several names were considered before Bruce recalled his dream of a clown running around in Delray, which became the inspiration for the group's new name: Insane Clown Posse. The other members agreed, deciding that they would take on this new genre and name, and would all don face paint due to the success of their former clown-painted hype man.[8] Upon returning home that night, Bruce says he had a dream in which "spirits in a traveling carnival appeared to him"—an image that would become the basis for the Dark Carnival mythology detailed in the group's Joker's Cards series.[8]



Spirituality

The themes of God's presence and the final judgment of individuals are explored in multiple Insane Clown Posse songs. Throughout their career, the group has used parables set within the Dark Carnival mythology to warn of the ultimate consequences of immoral behavior.[60][130] Their 2002 album The Wraith: Shangri-La, which ended the first set of Joker Card albums, with a song named The Unveiling, explicitly revealed that the hidden message of ICP's music was always to follow God.[55][60][130] Joseph Bruce remarked that "The ending of the Joker Cards, the way we looked at it, was death. Heaven and hell. That's up to each and every juggalo [to decide]."[60]

Several journalists have commented on the apparent conflict between the group's sexualized and often violent lyrics and their stated spiritual message.[128][130] In a June 2010 interview with The Columbian's Alan Sculley, Bruce explained, "[Sex and violence is] the stuff that people are talking about on the streets...to get attention, you have to speak their language. You have to interest them, gain their trust, talk to them and show you're one of them. You're a person from the street and speak of your experiences. Then at the end you can tell them God has helped me out like this and it might transfer over instead of just come straight out and just speak straight out of religion."[128]

In an October 2010 article for The Guardian, Jon Ronson characterized the Insane Clown Posse as "evangelical Christians" who have "only been pretending to be brutal and sadistic to trick their fans into believing in God."[130] In an interview with ICP conducted for the article, two of Ronson's queries referred parenthetically to ICP's "Christian message" and to the members' identities as "[secret] Christians." Several papers, including The Washington Post, published summaries of Ronson's claims.[131]

Eight days after publication of the Guardian article, Joseph Bruce tweeted "I think [it's] crazy how some press say we're a Christian band and act like we're all religious [...] I'm proud that we believe in God but I haven't been to church since I was like 10. I don't even know if [Utsler has] ever been to church!"[132][133][134] Christianity Today writer Mark Moring also challenged Ronson's characterization, writing that "The guys in ICP haven't used the word 'Christian' or 'evangelical' [...] so let's not call them anything that they're not claiming for themselves."[135]

In 2011, Insane Clown Posse appeared on Attack of the Show! and refuted claims that they were a Christian band.[136] Bruce explained that their Dark Carnival mythology "comes from the basic principle of right and wrong, you know; evil and good. That’s all. We’re just trying to say that there’s bad guys out there and that there’s good guys out there [...] We were taught there’s a heaven and a hell, but that’s all we were taught. We weren’t taught about the [Ten] Commandments [... or] what’s in the Bible and all that. We just [...] want to see good people hopefully go to heaven, which we refer to as Shangri-La."[136] Joseph Utsler explained in a 2002 interview with Craig Markley that "God is in your heart [...] In my definition, it doesn’t matter what creed, religion, or group you belong to. If you’re doing what’s right and are a good person, then you're right with God."[137] Bruce and Utsler have also stated that they are not certain that God and the afterlife exist, but that they'd like to believe that there is something after death.[138]

Wrestling



Current members

Violent J – rapping

Shaggy 2 Dope – rapping

Former members

John Kickjazz – rapping (1989–1992)

Greez-E – rapping (1992–1993)

Personnel

Mike E. Clark – producer (1992–2000; 2006–present)

DJ Chop – live turntables (1999)

Mike Puwal – producer (2000–2004)

DJ Clay – live turntables (2006–present)



this is boondox's info



Biography



Hutto was originally born in Richmond County, Georgia, but grew up in Covington, Georgia.[2] At the age of two, his uncle tried to kill him by drowning him in a swimming pool.[1][3] Hutto was not popular at his school, frequently got into fights and experimented with drug use.[1][3] He listened to heavy metal bands such as Iron Maiden, Metallica and Sepultura, and played bass guitar in several local metal bands before being a member of "Southern Hustlas Inc." and seeking a solo career as a rapper under the name "Turncoat Dirty".[3]

Hutto caught the attention of Insane Clown Posse while selling his cassettes at one of their concerts. Following several phone calls with group member Joseph Bruce, Hutto was signed to Psychopathic Records, making him the first Southern hip hop performer on the label.[1][2] Bruce and Joseph Utsler helped Hutto create the character Boondox, which took six months to fully develop.[4] Hutto released his first album under the Boondox name, The Harvest, on July 11, 2006. A music video directed by Bruce was filmed for the album's first single, "They Pray With Snakes," and Hutto toured with Blaze Ya Dead Homie to promote the album.[2][5]

In 2007, Hutto released the extended play PunkinHed. It peaked at #10 on the Billboard Top Heatseekers chart and #27 on the Top Independent Albums chart.[6] During the same year, he joined Psychopathic Rydas, performing under the name "Yung Dirt".[3] On May 13, 2008, Hutto released his second studio album, Krimson Creek, a more personal work drawing from his past.[3] It peaked at #1 on the Billboard Top Heatseekers chart, #13 on the Top Independent Albums chart, and #113 on the Billboard 200.[7] Hutto released his third studio album, South of Hell, on May 11, 2010.[8] The album also features a documentary directed by Paul Andreson about Hutto's life and the making of the album titled Southern Bled.[8]

In 2012, Hutto's Twitter account was hacked, leading Hutto to release a video via former hype man Cousin Cleetus' YouTube account.[9] Hutto later stated, in an interview with the fan site Faygoluvers, that he would be leaving Psychopathic because of personal issues, but is still on good terms with the label. He also plans to release a gangsta rap album independently under the alias Turncoat Dirty, and is currently in the production of a new Boondox album.[10] Hutto cites Insane Clown Posse as an influence on the horrorcore forbidden of his lyrics.[1] He's also planning on releasing an album with the Underground Avengers (which involve Boondox and underground favorites ClaAs and Bukshot) during the 13th Annual Gathering of the Juggalos.[11]

[edit]forbidden and influences



Hutto's music is rooted heavily in Southern hip hop, but also contains elements of country-rap, horrorcore and rap rock.[1][12][13] His lyrics also center around Southern culture.[1]

[edit]Discography



this is anybody killa's info



Lowery was raised on the east side of Detroit.[1] His parents were from Pembroke, North Carolina and were of the Lumbee tribe.[1] Lowery's father was a preacher.[1] His aunt and mother taught him about his Native American heritage, telling him Cherokee and Lumbee legends and teaching him about dreamcatchers.[1] Lowery started making music at a young age, using anything he could find as instruments, and began writing his own songs at the age of 13.[2] By the age of 15, local kids would pay to watch him perform in his garage.[2] In 1995, he formed the group Krazy Klan with childhood friend Lavel, performing as Jaymo and J-ho, respectively.[2] During this period, Lowery's middle finger was cut off at a side plant that produced parts for Chrysler.[1] After releasing two albums independently and performing at local clubs and parties, Krazy Klan broke up.[2]

Seeking a solo career under the stage name "Native Funk," Lowery released his first solo album, Rain from the Sun.[2][3] After being introduced to rapper Chris Rouleau, known professionally as "Blaze Ya Dead Homie," Lowery adopted the stage name "Anybody Killa," and the two toured as the opening act for Insane Clown Posse and Twiztid.[2] Lowery signed to Psychopathic Records, and recorded his second album, Hatchet Warrior, released on April 8, 2003. It peaked at #4 on the Billboard Top Independent Albums chart, #42 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart, and #98 on the Billboard 200.[4] Allmusic reviewer Johnny Loftus wrote that "Mostly, Hatchet Warrior is a rehash of [Psychopathic Records] mystique. References to Faygo abound and shout-outs to Detroit and the Juggalos are frequent, while much of ABK et al.'s raps are workmanlike run-throughs of familiar themes".[5]

On July 27, 2004, Lowery released his third album, Dirty History. It peaked at #7 on the Top Heatseekers chart, #10 on the Top Independent Albums, #53 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums, and #152 on the Billboard 200.[6] Lowery also joined the groups Dark Lotus and Psychopathic Rydas, performing in the latter as "Sawed Off." Lowery and Rouleau also formed the group Drive-By.[2] The EP Road Fools, released on March 22, 2005, peaked at #23 on the Top Independent Albums chart.[7] In 2006, Lowery left Psychopathic, continuing to release albums and merchandise from his Native World label.[2] In 2007, Lowery performed Main Stage at the Gathering of the Juggalos, and returned to Psychopathic Records the following year.[2] Since his return to the label, he has released 2 additional full-length albums, Mudface and Medicine Bag.

[edit]Lyrical and performance forbidden



Lowery's lyrical content draws heavily from his Native American heritage. Lowery refers to his forbidden as being "like a spiritual rap".[1] He states that "I get a vibe from dreams, more or less. That's where a lot of my writing comes from. That and a lot of my fans' personal experiences. [...] It's their music, my fans' music. I'm just putting it to words behind lyrics for them."[1] In his review of Hatchet Warrior, Allmusic's Johnny Loftus describes the album as crossing Native American culture with gangsta rap and horror themes and humor derived from Juggalo and cannabis culture.[5] Lowery has a lisp, which gives him a distinctive delivery.[1] According to Lowery, "A lot of fans will say, 'Oh, he's just doing that to make it up.' Why would I want to make up a lisp while I'm rappin? I wish it was gone sometimes but a lot of people love it."[1] After being interviewed in a 2008 documentary called: Shockumentary-Behind the hatchet, Lowery admitted he would be staying with Psychopathic Records once and for all.



this is blaze ya dead homie's info



Rouleau began rapping at the age of 17, while in Romeo High School, and performed at local clubs on the east side of Detroit.[1] Rouleau performed as a member of 2 Krazy Devils under the stage name Psycho C.[2] Rouleau's first big performance was at the Ritz in Roseville, where he and James Lowery opened for House of Krazees.[1] House of Krazees member The R.O.C. later produced 2 Krazy Devils' only album, Flipped Insanity, before the group disbanded in 1996.[2]

Rouleau joined several groups, but no material was released. When Rouleau was about to give up rapping, he was encouraged to join Psychopathic Records, where he initially started out as a member of Insane Clown Posse's road crew.[1][3] He appeared on Twiztid's Mostasteless album, and occasionally acted as a hype man in live concerts.[4] Rouleau joined Dark Lotus and Psychopathic Rydas, performing in the latter under the stage name "Cell Block."[4] In 2000, Rouleau released a solo EP, Blaze Ya Dead Homie, establishing his character as a reincarnated gang member killed in the late 1980s.[2] Rouleau toured major cities across the country to support the release, including a debut at the Gathering of the Juggalos.[4][5]

The LP 1 Less G N Da Hood was recorded and released in 2001, followed by continued touring and appearances on several Psychopathic releases.[5] On October 19, 2004, Rouleau released his second studio album, Colton Grundy: The Undying. It peaked at #9 on the Billboard Top Heatseekers chart, #16 on the Top Independent Albums chart, #57 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart, #167 on the Top Internet Albums chart, and #167 on the Billboard 200.[6] Rouleau formed the group Drive-By with Lowery, releasing the album Pony Down (Prelude) in 2005. The following year, Rouleau contributed two tracks to the video game 25 To Life, which also featured music by Tupac Shakur, Public Enemy, DMX, Geto Boys and Tech N9ne.[7] On August 21, 2007, Rouleau released his third studio album, Clockwork Gray. It peaked at #14 on the Top Independent Albums chart and at #34 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart.[6]

Rouleau's fourth studio album, Gang Rags, was released on June 22, 2010 and debuted number 52 on the Billboard 200.[8][9] While on the 2011 Drive-By Tour, he released Gang Rags Extended Version (Uncut + Uncensored).[10]

[edit]forbidden and influences



Rouleau's lyrical forbidden derives from gangsta rap and horrorcore.[2][11] Rouleau's music strongly derives from late 1980s/early 1990s West Coast hip hop,[11] and sometimes incorporates elements of rock music.[2][11] Rouleau's influences include Insane Clown Posse.[12] Rouleau also enjoys the music of Kiss, Black Sabbath, Iron Maiden, Journey, Twiztid, Slick Rick, LL Cool J, Run DMC, N.W.A and Ice-T.[1]



this is twiztid's info



Biography



Prior to Twiztid, Jamie Spaniolo and Paul Methric were members of the hip hop trio House of Krazees, under the names Mr. Bones and Hektic, along with the third member, the R.O.C.[1] The group released five albums before disbanding in 1997.[2] After the split, Methric and Spaniolo sent a demo tape to Insane Clown Posse member Joseph Bruce. The demo contained the tracks "2nd Hand Smoke," "Diemuthafuckadie," and "How Does It Feel?"[2] Bruce was extremely impressed, invited Methric and Spaniolo to perform on 'The House of Horrors Tour', and signed them to Psychopathic Records. Before the tour kicked off, Bruce, Methric and Spaniolo decided on a name that they felt would fit the duo—"Twiztid".[2] Twiztid's 1997 debut album, Mostasteless, was originally released independently by Psychopathic.[3] When Insane Clown Posse signed with Island Records, they helped get a deal for Twiztid as well.[4] After a show in Indianapolis, Twiztid's tour bus stopped at a Waffle House in Greenfield, Indiana. Spaniolo and Joseph Bruce became involved in an altercation with a customer causing a fight to break out between the lone customer and all of the bands' members.[5] Months later on June 4, 1998, Twiztid were charged with battery.[6]

In 1999, Mostasteless was pulled, and re-released on Island with somewhat different track listing.[4] That track listing included brand new songs, but left out tracks such as "Murder Murder Murder" and "She Ain't Afraid" because of uncleared samples.[4] In his review of the reissued album, Allmusic's Stephen Thomas Erlewine wrote that "[Although] the thought of a group of Insane Clown Posse protégés isn't exactly inspiring", the album "may take you by surprise...Mostasteless actually works better than most ICP records," that "Twiztid often is more convincing than [its] Dark Carnival colleagues," and concluded that "if you don't buy into the whole comic book-horror schtick, Mostasteless...will be irritating, but if you've bought into it, you'll enjoy this record as much, if not more, than most ICP albums."[7] Mostasteless peaked at #8 on the Billboard Top Heatseekers chart, and #149 on the Billboard 200.[8]

On October 31, 2000, Twiztid released their second studio album, Freek Show. In his review of the album, Allmusic's Brad Mills wrote that "this kind of music appeals to a small sector of hip-hop listeners and will probably do well within [its] niche market, but the average hip-hop listener will just have to understand that this is a different kind of album."[9] The album peaked at #51 on the Billboard 200.[8] In 2002, Twiztid released the extended play Mirror Mirror. Allmusic reviewer Bradley Torreano praised the EP, writing that "Despite the fact that few outside of the juggalo family will give this a chance, this might be one of the most accurate portrayals of the mood of most unhappy young people in 2002".[10] Mirror Mirror peaked at #5 on the Top Independent Albums chart, and #103 on the Billboard 200.[8] In 2003, Twiztid released its third studio album, The Green Book. Spaniolo has referred to the album as a "Juggalo favorite".[11] Allmusic reviewer Rob Theakston panned the album, writing that it "is much, much better than the last ICP card record, but looking at the forest from the trees, that really isn't saying much anymore."[12] The Green Book peaked at #2 on the Top Independent Charts and #52 on the Billboard 200.[8]

On June 28, 2005, Twiztid released its fourth studio album, Man's Myth (Vol. 1), the first half of a double album concluding with Mutant (Vol. 2), released the following month.[13] Man's Myth focuses on the angst of growing up in a lying world, while Mutant deals with the outcome of this upbringing.[13] Allmusic reviewer David Jeffries praised Man's Myth, writing that "it reaches farther outside the suburban trash world of Psychopathic Records than anything the label has released previously. Twiztid keep growing lyrically too and the album is edited tightly with little filler."[13] Man's Myth peaked at #4 on the Top Independent Albums chart, #62 on the Top Internet Albums chart and the Billboard 200.[8] Mutant peaked at #11 on the Top Independent Albums chart, #80 on the Billboard 200, and #215 on the Top Internet Albums chart.[8]

On July 4, 2007, Twiztid released its sixth studio album, Independents Day. The album featured guest appearances from rappers signed to independent record labels, such as The Dayton Family, Tha Dogg Pound, Hed PE frontman Jared Gomes, Tech N9ne and Krizz Kaliko. It also notably features appearances by D12 members Proof and Bizarre. The group's leader, Eminem, had feuded with Insane Clown Posse.[14] The album peaked at #4 on the Top Independent Albums chart, #9 on the Top Rap Albums chart and #57 on the Billboard 200.[8] In September 2007, the group's Toxic Terror Tour was cancelled after Methric suffered a torn Anterior cruciate ligament following a car accident, but the tour was booked again in early 2008.[15]

On March 17, 2009, Twiztid released its seventh studio album, W.I.C.K.E.D. (Wish I Could Kill Every Day).[16] W.I.C.K.E.D was Twiztid's highest charting album, peaking at #11 on the Billboard 200, #4 on the Top Rap Albums chart, and #1 on the Top Independent Albums chart.[8] Twiztid's ninth studio album, "Heartbroken & Homicidal," was released on September 21, 2010.[17] Recently in an interview, they have announced a new album entitled Abominations due October 23, 2012. It was also announced that Twiztid would release a song featuring Royce Da 5'9. On one of their Tweets, they stated that Hopsin would be on their next album.[18]

[edit]forbidden and influences



Twiztid's performance forbidden is often described as horrorcore hip hop.[19] According to Spaniolo, "Think of it as if there was a Halloween or Friday the 13th on wax and Jason and Michael Myers could actually rap, this is what their vibe would sound like."[20] Spaniolo has cited Kiss as an influence.[11] While Man's Myth featured a hip hop-oriented sound, Mutant featured a rock oriented sound.[11] According to Spaniolo, "I've always wanted to do a Rock album and to date that was the closest thing to it we have ever done, so it holds a special place in my heart."[11]





~~~ courtesy of MarlboroMan55








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